First SoulPhone “hello”

What would it take for the world to take afterlife research seriously?

What would have to happen before more people accepted scientific research and technology that demonstrates that life continues after physical death?

Would a first SoulPhone™ “hello there” from another dimension do the trick?

Go back for a moment to March 10, 1876, when Alexander Graham Bell placed a call to his assistant, Thomas, who was in another room at the time:  “Mr. Watson—come here—I want to see you.” That was the first telephone call ever, and it eventually changed the whole world.

The SoulPhone is in its Alexander Graham Bell days, albeit with a new cast.

Every time I see news about this or that scientific research being funded for millions if not billions of dollars—like some of our space voyages—I think about the comparative pittance paid to conduct afterlife research. We’d like to go to Mars to study some other planet in an attempt to learn more about the origin of our own planet, but we as a society seem unmotivated to explore what happens to us when we die. We think we know the answer—that when you die, you die, and that’s it.

Some of our basic government-sponsored activities like warfare, capital punishment, and unfair allocation of resources could be—and I think would be—severely impacted if research showed us that consciousness survives physical death. Afterlife research could provide proof that many of our traditions and priorities today are disastrously short-sighted.

CHANGES COMING

The SoulPhone could also be the modern-day equivalent of the building of the first transcontinental railroad in the US in the 1860s. In that endeavor, one group built east from San Francisco/Oakland and another group built west from St. Louis. The lines eventually met in Utah. Along with the railroad, this venture also brought continental telegraphy—another use of the yes/no switch, explained below. Both of these technologies ultimately opened up the West to commerce and permanently changed the face of the country as new towns sprang up. Once thought impossible to be built, the first transcontinental railroad rewrote what was possible.

The SoulPhone is similar. A group of scientists and engineers in this world are working to develop communication with those living in non earthly realms. A group of hypothesized collaborative spirits who were scientists and inventors while on earth are working to make this contact. The first step is the SoulSwitch™, an on/off or yes/no switch.

Proof of concept studies supporting the likelihood of this device have been performed by Dr. Gary Schwartz and his team using strict scientific protocols. There is a 99% degree of certainty that the first reliably functioning prototype will be ready as soon as 2018.  As basic as the SoulSwitch is, it will be a major stepping stone to creating other SoulPhone modalities including the SoulKeyboard, SoulVoice, and SoulVideo.

Dr. Schwartz has been conducting his research with a relative pittance of funding, relative to many capital outlays for various other research projects. That fact makes his progress even more remarkable than it already is. Again, it also speaks to the low priority this kind of research holds in the world at large.

In the not-too-distant future, that tune could change quite dramatically. Successful testing of the SoulSwitch could be the event that rocks the boat, tips the scale, and sets into motion a reordering of priorities. It may be like the pounding of the golden spike and the telegraph message that heralded a changing world.

FIRST TRANSCONTINENTAL TELEGRAPH

An interesting communications parallel from history is the first transcontinental telegraph, completed in 1861. Essentially an on/off switch, the system connected an existing East Coast network to other links in Omaha, Nebraska, Salt Lake City, Utah, and finally reached California. A milestone in electrical engineering, it allowed nearly instantaneous communication between the coasts during the 1860s.

By contrast, it took 110 days in 1841 for the news of President William Henry Harrison’s death in Washington, D.C. to reach Los Angeles. Soon Harrison might be able to use a SoulPhone to say “hello there.”

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